Community and Games Quizzes

Daily Quiz: Wednesday 30th September 2020

What is the minimum amount of games required to play to win a set in tennis?

Correct! Wrong!

In the 12th century tennis was initially played with just the hands. It was called “jeu de paume” – palm game. Presumably people’s hands became rather sore playing this game. It wasn’t until the 16th century that rackets were introduced. Wimbledon is the oldest tennis competition on the planet and is additionally viewed as the most esteemed. Wimbledon ‘s first matches were played in 1877. It is additionally the first of the four “Grand Slams” to be established.

Which month is also known as Pipiri in Maori language?

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According to the maramataka, or Māori lunar calendar, the winter month of Hereturi-kōkā is so cold that ‘the scorching effect of fire is seen on the knees of man.’ But as the moon continues to wax and wane, the earth warms up and by the summer month of Kohi-tātea, fruit hangs ripe on the trees. The maramataka divided the traditional Māori year into 12 lunar months. The word marama means both the moon and the lunar month – a lunar month is the 29 and a half days between successive new moons. The months were commonly listed numerically: May–June was Te Tahi (the first), June–July was Te Rua (the second), and so on. Each month also had its own name, which sometimes varied between tribes.

Which month is named after the first Emperor of Rome?

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In 8 B.C. Augustus had the Roman month of Sextilius renamed after himself—as his great-uncle and predecessor Julius Caesar had done with July. August was the month of several of the emperor's greatest victories, including the defeat and suicide of Antony and Cleopatra. He did not increase the month's length, which had been 31 days since the establishment of the Julian calendar in 45 B.C.

What is the capital of Jordan?

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It may be one of the oldest cities on the planet, in fact. Archaeological evidence suggests that what is now Amman witnessed human settlement as early as the 13th century BC. It was also established on the surface of our world so long ago that it features in the Bible (as Rabath Ammon).

In which city was Anne Frank's hiding place?

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Anne chose her own diary – an autograph book bound with white and red checked cloth, and closed with a small lock – as a present for her 13th birthday. This birthday, on Friday 12 June 1942, was the last before she and her family went into hiding. To mark the occasion, Anne’s mother, Edith, made cookies for Anne to share with her friends at school. Anne also enjoyed a party with a strawberry pie and a room decorated with flowers. Anne’s first entries describe how her family were segregated and discriminated against. Anne addressed many of her entries to an imaginary girl friend, ‘Dear Kitty’ or ‘Dearest Kitty’. Written over the course of two years, Anne’s diary details the time that her family spent in hiding during the Nazis’ occupation of the Netherlands.

How many sides does a heptagon have?

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A Heptagon which is also known as Septagon is a type of Polygon having seven sides.

What number is a baker’s dozen?

Correct! Wrong!

There are a few theories as to why a baker’s dozen became 13, but the most widely accepted one has to do with avoiding a beating. In medieval England there were laws that related the price of bread to the price of the wheat used to make it. Bakers who were found to be “cheating” their customers by overpricing undersized loaves were subject to strict punishment, including fines or flogging. Even with careful planning it is difficult to ensure that all of your baked goods come out the same size; there may be fluctuations in rising and baking and air content, and many of these bakers didn’t even have scales to weigh their dough. For fear of accidentally coming up short, they would throw in a bit extra to ensure that they wouldn’t end up with a surprise flogging later. In fact, sometimes a baker’s dozen was 14—just to be extra sure.

Where is the Great Barrier Reef located?

Correct! Wrong!

Corals are formed by tiny creatures called polyps that have a sac-like body with emerging tentacles. Corals gain their rock-like structure from the polyps as they use calcium and carbonate ions from the seawater to create a hard outer skeleton to protect their soft bodies. These polyps survive due to their relationship with the algae that live alongside them. The algae absorb light from the sun and subsequently feed the coral. The algae also give the corals their bright colours. Corals are, in fact, nocturnal and it is under the cover of darkness that the polyps emerge from their outer casings to catch small creatures that pass by. With almost 3,000 individual reefs, 900 islands, and stretching for 2,600km there is no denying the reef is massive. This incredible living system can even be viewed from space. If you want to get an idea of size, then imagine the country of Italy lying just off the coast of Australia and you begin to get an idea of its vastness.

Which country gifted the Statue of Liberty to the US?

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Sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi has trumped any Mother’s Day gift you could ever come up with: He used his mother, Charlotte, as the model for the most recognized statue in the world. This was first discovered in 1876, when Bartholdi invited French Senator Jules Bozerian to his box at the opera. When Bozerian pulled back the curtain to step into the box, he was shocked to find a real-life version of the Statue of Liberty sitting there in the box. When he said so to Bartholdi, the sculptor smiled: “But do you know who this lady is? She’s my mother,” he told the senator.

What is the rarest blood type?

Correct! Wrong!

Only 1% Kiwis have AB Negative blood type.

Daily Quiz: Wednesday 30th September 2020
Well done, try again tomorrow
Not bad, can you go better tomorrow?
Pretty good, how many can you get tomorrow?
EXCELLENT! how many can you get tomorrow?


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